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Is Lyme Disease in KS & MO?

Is Lyme Disease in Kansas and Missouri?

We cannot emphasize enough that tick-borne diseases are a threat throughout the United States and in many other countries.
Are YOU at risk for Tick-born diseases?
  • Tick-borne diseases are present in our community.

  • Tick-borne diseases can be contracted at home, or when traveling for work or pleasure.

  • People can pick up ticks at area parks, camps, golf courses, farms, and even backyards or ticks that hitch a ride into the home on pets

  • An individual can become re-infected if bitten again at a later time by another infected tick

  • More than one disease can be acquired from a single tick bite and co-infections make diagnosis and treatment more difficult

What are the common hosts for ticks in Kansas and Missouri?
  • Ticks on migrating birds carry tick-borne diseases to new areas

  • Lone star and deer tick nymphs (baby ticks) are very small, about the size of a poppy seed, and are often unnoticed

  • Ticks feed on mammals, birds, and reptiles.

  • Wild animals can be infected with tick-borne diseases without becoming ill, and they then serve as reservoirs to infect other ticks

  • Chipmunks, rabbits, mice, and other small mammals are common reservoir hosts.  Reservoir hosts are animals that can maintain the infection without getting sick and can pass it on to ticks that bite them.

  • Dogs, cats, and farm animals can become ill with tick-borne diseases.

What tick-borne diseases are found in Kansas and Missouri?
  • Lyme Disease

  • Master’s disease (similar to Lyme in rash, other symptoms, and treatment)

  • STARI

  • Babesia (strain MO-1 in Missouri)

  • Bartonella

  • Ehrlichiosis*

  • Anaplasma

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever*

  • Other Rickettsial diseases (Spotted fever group Rickettsia, SFGR)

  • Mycoplasma

  • Tularemia*

  • Q Fever

  • Tick Paralysis

  • Heartland virus

  • Red meat allergy

*Missouri is one of the leading states in reports of Ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Tularemia

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